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Facts You Should Know About Shale Energy


   Total government revenues generated by the unconventional energy supply chain will increase from more than $16 billion in 2015 to about $23 billion in 2025.
(Source: IHS Economics: "Supplying the Unconventional Revolution", 2014)

   Total employment across the supply chain is estimated to grow at an annual compound rate of about 3%, from about 524,000 jobs in 2012 to 757,000 jobs in 2025, a total increase of about 45%.
(Source: IHS Economics: "Supplying the Unconventional Revolution", 2014)

   Average income per employee working for shale oil and gas supply chain companies is estimated at about $79,000.
(Source: IHS Economics: "Supplying the Unconventional Revolution", 2014)

   The value of goods and services provided by the supply chain to shale energy operations will increase from nearly $146 billion in 2012 to almost $206 billion in 2025.
(Source: IHS Economics: "Supplying the Unconventional Revolution", 2014)

   Shale energy supply chain jobs account for 2% of total state employment in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Supply chain employment accounts for 1% of total state employment in Arkansas, Colorado, and Pennsylvania.
(Source: IHS Economics: "Supplying the Unconventional Revolution", 2014)

   Shale energy supply chain workers' total incomes will grow from an total of $41 billion in 2012 to close to $60 billion in 2025.
(Source: IHS Economics: "Supplying the Unconventional Revolution", 2014)

   Natural gas from hydraulic fracturing lowered the average American's household energy bill by $1,200 in 2012, by $2,700 by 2020, and by $3,800 by 2025.
(Source: America’s New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy; Volume 3: A Manufacturing Renaissance; IHS Global insight, September 2013)

   In March 2011, oil imports accounted for 66.2 percent of the U.S. trade deficit. In April 2014, they accounted for just 38.4 percent, due to rising U.S. crude oil production from shale.
(Source: U. S. Census Bureau)

   "Responsible development of natural gas is an important part of our work to curb climate change and support a robust clean energy market at home."
(Source: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy, August 2013)

   Oil and gas from shale will contribute $468 billion annually to America's gross domestic product by 2020.
(Source: America’s New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy; Volume 3: A Manufacturing Renaissance; IHS Global insight, September 2013)

   IHS estimates that total government revenues generated by the unconventional energy supply chain will increase from more than $13 billion in 2012 to more than $16 billion in 2015 and to about $23 billion in 2025.
(Source: IHS Global: The Economic Impacts of the Unconventional Energy Supply Chain, 2014)

   Oil and gas from shale created 2.1 million American jobs in 2012; will create 3.3 million more jobs by 2020; 3.9 million more jobs by 2025.
(Source: America’s New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy; Volume 3: A Manufacturing Renaissance; IHS Global insight, September 2013)

   The number of jobs created by the energy supply chain is estimated to grow from about 524,000 in 2012 to 757,000 jobs in 2025, an annual compounded growth rate of about 3%, and an increase of about 45%.
(Source: IHS Global: The Economic Impacts of the Unconventional Energy Supply Chain, 2014)

   Total U.S. crude oil production is averaging 9 million barrels per day, up from 5 million barrels per day in 2008, an increase of 80%.
(Source: U. S. Energy Information Administration)

   The amount of labor income generated by employment across the unconventional energy supply chain will grow from $41 billion in 2012 to $60 billion in 2025
(Source: IHS Global: The Economic Impacts of the Unconventional Energy Supply Chain, 2014)

   Oil and gas from shale will lower the American trade deficit by $180 billion per year by 2022.
(Source: America’s New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy; Volume 3: A Manufacturing Renaissance; IHS Global insight, September 2013)

   "The contrast between the United States and other large importers is striking: annual energy imports in the United States have fallen by 40% since 2008, while they increased slightly in the European Union and continued to climb in many other regions."
(Source: International Energy Agency (IEA); 2013 World Energy Outlook)

   Oil and gas from shale contributed $75 billion of tax revenues in 2012; $125 billion annually by 2020; $138 billion annually by 2025; $1.6 trillion cumulative from 2012 to 2025.
(Source: America’s New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy; Volume 3: A Manufacturing Renaissance; IHS Global insight, September 2013)

   "Environmentalists who oppose the development of shale gas and fracking are making a tragic mistake." Richard A. Muller (University of California - Berkeley)
(Source: Why Every Serious Environmentalist Should Favour Fracking; Richard A. Muller (University of California - Berkeley) and Elizabeth Muller (Berkeley Earth); December, 2013)

   Between now and 2025, oil and gas from shale will cause over $200 billion of new investment in refining, processing, and chemical manufacturing capacity in the United States.
(Source: America’s New Energy Future: The Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution and the US Economy; Volume 3: A Manufacturing Renaissance; IHS Global insight, September 2013)

   Because of shale energy development, US crude oil production has increased 80 percent since 2008, while imports have fallen 33 percent.
(Source: U. S. Energy Information Administration)

   U. S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions fell 12% between 2005 and 2015 and are at their lowest level since 1992, despite economic growth of over 80% during the period. The U.S. leads the world in CO2 emission reductions. Thank natural gas.
(Source: U. S. Energy Information Administration - 2016)

   Between 2006 and 2013, proved US lower 48 reserves of natural gas have increased by 75%, from 200 trillion cubic feet (TCF) to 348 trillion TCF.
(Source: U. S. Energy Information Administration)



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State-based Regulation

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Media

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