Energy Infrastructure
Energy EquipmentEnergy Infrastructure
Building and Serving an Energy Secure America


Key Issues


EEIA advocates for policies at both federal and state/provincial levels that support the North American energy renaissance, and the jobs, prosperity, energy security and affordability it delivers to its workers and consumers.

EEIA's policy priorities are directed toward maintaining robust levels of safe, responsible shale energy development and market-based choices for consumption, for the benefit of American consumers, energy value chain workers, and American economic and energy security.

All Forms of Energy
EEIA believes that the country and the world need a mix of all forms of energy, and will continue to for the foreseeable future. The guiding principle should be that production and consumption be determined primarily by market forces that reflect the costs of producing and delivering energy to the consumer.

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State-based Regulation
Upstream oil and gas operations should be regulated primarily at the state, rather than federal, level. States have an excellent record of regulation that has ensured the safety and health of communities and the quality of the environment. States best understand their unique geology, hydrology and business environments and are far better qualified to regulate energy operations within their borders than is the federal government.

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Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Exports
Numerous applications are pending before the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)to permit construction of LNG terminals for export of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to non-free trade agreement countries, which comprise the lion's share of potential foreign markets for America's abundant natural gas. The resulting lack of access to global markets is restricting natural gas production and investment and is denying the American economy a new source of jobs and growth. Congress should pass legislation requiring expedited review of applications submitted for approval.

(read more)    EEIA Letter to Congress Urging Passage of Legislation to Expedite Permitting Process


Tax Policy
Federal tax policy should continue to encourage capital investment, cost recovery and re-investment in exploration, production, transportation and processing of oil and gas. In particular, the current provisions for deductibility of intangible drilling costs should be maintained. These provisions have been in effect throughout much of the industry's history. Current law facilitates higher-velocity reinvestment in new wells, benefitting the economy and consumers by increasing supplies of oil and gas.

(read more)    EEIA Letter to Congress re Intangible Drilling costs


Streamline Pipeline Permitting
Issuance of pipeline construction permits should be routine and expeditious. In many highly populated areas of the country, consumers and businesses alike suffer high and volatile energy costs during peak demand periods. This is not due to lack of energy supplies. It is because there is insufficient pipeline capacity to deliver those supplies to areas of greatest need. A major cause is delay in permitting new pipeline construction. In particular, the inordinate delay in approval of the construction of Keystone XL is contrary to the national interest.

(read more)    EEIA letter to Congress supporting streamlined processing of permits


Access to Offshore Resources
Substantial reserves of crude oil and natural gas exist in areas of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) currently off-limits to exploration and production. Increasing U.S. offshore energy production would create many thousands of new jobs in the energy supply chain, raise billions of dollars for the government and strengthen Americas energy and national security. As our government works on the next offshore leasing program, it should consider including all potential producing areas with the potential to generate jobs and new revenue by advancing America's energy renaissance.

(read more)    EEIA Recommendations for expanded access to offshore resources


Access to Energy Resources on Federal Lands
Vast energy resources exist in the America's federally-owned lands. Governing federal agencies often restrict or deny access to industry to explore for and produce these resources. Where access is permitted, excessive federal regulation and restrictions often render much of this resource uneconomical to produce. The effect is to deny the great potential benefit of significant new energy supplies to the American economy.

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Workforce Needs
Because of the rapid growth of shale energy operations and supporting infrastructure development, essential skilled workers are in short supply in many critical trades and in most energy operating regions. New and enhanced Federal, state and private educational support policies, programs and resources are needed to address existing and future energy infrastructure workforce readiness.

(read more)


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About EEIA

What is EEIA?

EEIA Mission and Scope

Our Companies and People

Key Issues

All Forms of Energy

State-based Regulation

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Exports

Tax Policy

Streamline Pipeline Permitting

Access to Offshore Resources

Access to Energy Resources on Federal Lands

Workforce Needs

Media

EEIA Urges Swift Senate Confirmation of FERC Nominees

Energy Industry Hits Back at USBancorp Over Anti-Pipeline Policy

EEIA Urges President to Green Light Dakota Access Pipeline

EEIA Launches Pipeline Support Network

EEIA, Supply Chain Allies Urge Congress to Adopt Common-sense Energy Policies

Obama Oil Tax Proposal to Cost Jobs, Raise Energy Prices

EEIA Applauds the End of Ban on Crude Oil Exports

Reps. Barton and Cuellar: The Most Substantial New Energy Policy in a Generation

Energy Exports Would Spur 500,000 New Supply Chain Jobs



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